Major and Minor Requirements

 
Requirements for the Major in Africana Studies
Major requirements ensure that students are thoroughly exposed to the broad range of research and scholarship in the discipline. Africana Studies majors must complete at least 11 courses from the following list, plus a senior exercise (project, thesis, or comprehensive examination). While six of these courses are expected to be at the upper-division level, credit will be given, where appropriate, to courses numbered lower than 100. Students elect to focus on one of the following areas of concentration: Arts, Humanities, or Social Sciences.

AFRI/AS10A&B: Introduction to Africana Studies; two courses. This is a two-semester course that should be completed by the end of the student’s sophomore year.

LITERATURE (African, African American, or Caribbean); one course.

HISTORY (African, African American, or Caribbean); one course.

SOCIAL SCIENCE (e.g., Anthropology; Economics, Politics, Psychology, or Sociology); one course from the list of approved Africana Studies courses.

ART HISTORY, MUSIC, or RELIGION: one course from the list of approved Africana Studies courses.

FOUR (4) courses that represent Africa and its Diaspora in the student’s area of concentration within the major, e.g. Arts, Humanities, or Social Sciences.

SENIOR SEMINAR: Required of all majors; and 191 (thesis), 192 (project), or 193 (comprehensive exam).

Upon approval by the department Chair, substitutions in the major requirements can be made to respond to an individual student’s interests and needs.

Students majoring in Africana Studies are strongly encouraged to spend a semester or a year abroad, preferably in Brazil or countries in Africa or the Caribbean.

In addition, the department strongly recommends that students take 4 semesters of a language spoken in the African Diaspora:  Arabic, French, Portuguese, Spanish, or an African language.

Requirements for the Minor in Africana Studies.

MINOR: For the Africana Studies minor, students are required to complete seven courses in Africana Studies, two of which must be the two-semester AFRI/AS 10A&B course, and five other Africana Studies courses that represent at least three (3) disciplines.

 

Graduate Certificate Program


The purpose of the Africana Studies Graduate Certificate Program is to foster the acquisition of knowledge about Africa and the African Diaspora: their cultures, their histories, and their politics.

The Certificate Program is a joint endeavor between the Claremont Graduate University and the Intercollegiate Department of Africana Studies (IDAS) of The Claremont Colleges.

Requirements

Any CGU student enrolled in an M.A. or Ph.D. program may concurrently pursue a Certificate in Africana Studies. The certificate requires a minimum of five, 4-unit courses, including a core course titled “Concepts and Methods in Africana Studies.” The courses must be approved by the Graduate Certificate Review Committee (GCRC).

The approved course sequence requires coherence and demonstration of substantive breadth, and relevance to Africana Studies. All five of the courses may count as credit for the M.A. or Ph.D. For the certificate to be awarded, a student must attain a minimum GPA of 3.0 in the courses taken for the certificate.

Application and Enrollment Procedures

Students enrolled in a CGU degree program may apply for the Africana Studies certificate program by completing the Certificate/Degree Program Change Form and submitting it to Susan Hampson in the School of Arts and Humanities office. 

Completing and Receiving the Certficate

Once students have completed all of the requirements they must fill out an Intent to Receive a Degree form and the Master's Degree - or - Certificate Final Approval form to receive the certificate. Links to both forms can be found at: http://www.cgu.edu/pages/5068.asp.

 

Download a copy of this course list [PDF]

Fall Semester 2016

Class & Code

Course Description

Time & Location

Intro to Africana Studies

(AFRI010A AF-01)

Interdisciplinary exploration of key aspects of Black history, culture and life in Africa and the Americas. Provides a fundamental, intellectual understanding of the global Black experience as it has been described and interpreted in the arts, humanities and social sciences. Soliman, Maryan

TR 01:15–02:30PM. HM Room 120 (Humanities Building) (Scripps)

SENIOR SEMINAR

(AFRI190 AF-01)

Seminar for Africana studies majors. Complements guidance of primary thesis advisor, by focusing on interdisciplinary research strategies and data collection methods; development of authorial voice for the interrogation of African/African Diasporan topics, notions of race and manifestations of racism. Emphasis on writing, rewriting and peer review. Minors require instructor’s permission.. Hurley, Eric A.

TR 11:00AM–12:15PM. LINC Room 1109 (Lincoln) (Pomona)

Senior Thesis

(AFRI191 AF-04)

Senior Thesis. In the Senior Seminar, students will undertake independent research culminating in a substantial thesis. The thesis work will be supervised by one faculty member chosen by the student. Each thesis will be read by one additional reader. Hurley, Eric A.

To Be Arranged — Campus

Senior Thesis

(AFRI191 AF-06)

Senior Thesis. In the Senior Seminar, students will undertake independent research culminating in a substantial thesis. The thesis work will be supervised by one faculty member chosen by the student. Each thesis will be read by one additional reader. Thomas, Valorie D.

To Be Arranged — Campus

Senior Thesis

(AFRI191 AF-08)

Senior Thesis. In the Senior Seminar, students will undertake independent research culminating in a substantial thesis. The thesis work will be supervised by one faculty member chosen by the student. Each thesis will be read by one additional reader. Walker, Sheila

To Be Arranged — Campus

Senior Project

(AFRI192 AF-04)

Senior Thesis. In the Senior Seminar, students will undertake independent research culminating in a substantial thesis. The thesis work will be supervised by one faculty member chosen by the student. Each thesis will be read by one additional reader. Walker, Sheila

To Be Arranged — Campus

Senior Comprehensive Examination

(AFRI193 AF-04)

Senior Comprehensive Examination. In the Senior Seminar, students will prepare for the exam to be taken during their senior year. The comprehensive examination consists of two field examinations that test the depth of the student’s knowledge of Africana Studies. The student chooses two areas in Africana studies (e.g., history and literature) in which to be examined. Walker, Sheila

To Be Arranged — Campus

Daughters Africa Art Cinema Love

(ARHI144B PO-01)

Examines visual arts and cultural criticism produced by women from Africa and the African Diaspora (North America, Caribbean and Europe). Students analyze aesthetic values, key representational themes, visual conventions, symbolic codes and stylistic approaches created from feminism's spirited love of Blackness, Africanness and justice. Complement to AFRI144A AF, Black Women Feminism(s) and Social Change. Letter grade only. Jackson, Phyllis J.

T 01:15–04:00PM. LE Room 201 (LeBus Court) (Pomona)

Black Aesth/Poli (Re)presentatn

(ARHI178 PO-01)

Course examines the visual arts (including painting, sculpture, photography, prints, textiles, mixed media, installations, performance, independent film and video) produced by people of African descent in the United States from the colonial era to the present. Emphasis on Black artists' changing relationship to African arts and cultures, the emergence of an oppositional aesthetic tradition interrogating visual constructs of “Blackness” and “Whiteness,” gender, sexuality and class as a means of revisioning representational practices. Course provides a social-historical frame for the interpretation and analysis of form, content and the production of historically situated cultural criticism. Letter grade only. Jackson, Phyllis J.

R 01:15–04:00PM. LE Room 201 (LeBus Court) (Pomona)

History of Africa to 1800

(HIST040 AF-01)

History of Africa to 1800. History of Africa from the earliest times to the beginning of the 19th century. Attention given to the methodology and theoretical framework used by the Africanist, the development of early African civilizations and current debates and trends in the historiography of Africa. (Core course, Africa and the African Diaspora). Traore, Makhroufi Ousmane

TR 01:15–02:30PM. MA Room 20 (Mason Hall) (Pomona)

Black Intellectuals & Polit Race

(HIST173 AF-01)

This course examines ideas about race, nationality, and citizenship in African American intellectual thought in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Taught as a reading/discussion seminar, students are introduced to major themes, controversies, and contradictions among Black intellectuals engaged in public and scholarly conversations about the role and function of race in contemporary U.S. society. Roberts, Rita

W 02:45–05:30PM. HM Room 203 (Humanities Building) (Scripps)

Community Poetry: Black Feminist rEVO

(ENGL009 AF-01)

Through Black feminist theories of social justice and aesthetic models of revolutionary poetry in this course students practice the art of being an intelligent witness-participant of community engagement via poetic expression. Harris, Laura

T 05:00–08:15PM. AV Room 201 (Avery Hall) (Pitzer)

Intro to African American lit after 1865

(ENGL012 AF 01)

This course is a survey of major periods, authors and genres in the African American literary tradition. This course covers the major literatures produced from the late nineteenth century to the contemporary period. Harris, Laura.

W 07:00–09:50PM. AV Room 201 (Avery Hall) (Pitzer)

Post-Apartheid Narratives

(LIT 155 HM-01)

This seminar maps the literary terrain of contemporary South Africa. Through an examination of prose, poetry, and visual material, this course offers some of the responses writers have given to the end of Apartheid, to major social events such as the hearings of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, and to the idea of a “new” South Africa. 3 credit hours. Balseiro, Isabel.

M 02:45–05:30PM. SHAN Room 2465 (Shanahan Center) (Harvey Mudd)

North African Literature after Independence

(FREN132 CM-01)

In the 1950s and 1960s the people of many colonized countries across the African continent waged struggles for national independence. In North Africa, as elsewhere, once independence was gained, other struggles emerged though with different objectives and in different forms and contexts. After independence, national culture has been a central issue. Writers in particular have played a key role addressing some of the major debates concerning religion, national tradition, language, music, and even the form of everyday life. In the past decades, writers have been engulfed in a new wave of cultural change as the North African populace has been deeply influenced by new Islamicist movements, and the politics of Arabicization. In this course, we will examine the situation of the writer in North Africa, “post-Independence”. Aitel, Fazia.

MW 01:15–02:30PM. KRV Room 109 (The Kravis Center) (CMC)

Africana Political Theory in US

(POLI149 AF-01)

Given the Black dispersal throughout the world, Africana Political Theory will analyze the intersection of race, class, gender, and sexuality in the formation of political structures through the African Diaspora. Utilizing the texts of Black scholars throughout the Diaspora, the course will provide a broad look into Black politics. Prerequisite: at least one course in Africana Studies. Soliman, Maryan.

W 01:15–04:00PM. ST Room 107 (Steele Hall) (Scripps)

Intro African American Psychology

(PSYC012 AF-01)

This course provides an introduction to African American Psychology. It includes perspectives, education, community, life span development, gender and related issues. The course emphasizes the critical examination of current research and theory. Students are expected to contribute orally and in writing. Hurley, Shelva.

TR 09:35–10:50. AV Room 224 (Avery Hall) (Pitzer)

Psych of the Black Experience

(PSYC150 AF-01)

Psychology of the Black Experience. Facilitates students’ understanding of the African-American psychological experience. Critical review of historical and traditional approaches to the psychological study of Black people; examines the contributions of the first three generations of Black psychologists who set the foundations for the current generation. Concludes with a look at Black psychology today and its influence on the mainstream of the field. Prerequisite: 51. Hurley, Eric A.

TR 08:10–09:25AM. LINC Room 1125 (Lincoln) (Pomona)

Prob of Evil: African-American Engagements

(RLST142 AF-01)

Thematically explores the many ways African-Americans have encountered and responded to evils (pain, wickedness and undeserved suffering) both as a part of and apart from the broader Western tradition. We will examine how such encounters trouble the distinction made between natural and moral evil and how they highlight the tensions between theodicies and further ethical concerns. (CWS, PRT). Smith, Darryl A.

W 07:00–09:50PM. PR Room 202 (Pearsons Hall) (Pomona)

Moon Called Black Women Pregnancy & Childbirth

(SOC 108 PZ-01)

Moon Called: Black Women, Pregnancy, and Ritual The moon’s connection to women’s wombs is honored within southeastern African American: a) folklore and menstruation, birthing, pregnancy and fertility rituals; b) midwifery practice; and c) superstitions. The course is divided into four sections, with each section being organized around one or more major questions about the ways in which culture, religion and society influenced the ways in which pregnancy, menstruation, and birthing are viewed among African Americans. We begin with an introduction of the social roles of rituals, and how pregnancy symbolizes social cohesion for communities of color. We then explore symbolic rituals within African American pregnancy and birthing traditions as practiced by Black midwives on slave plantations and within southern US black communities post-Emancipation. We next critically analyze the social codification of pregnancy and birthing by the US medical establishment and its impact on Black midwifery practice, and end with a feminist investigation of how certain rituals and superstitions persist within Black communities via feminist qualitative methods, namely one-on-one interviews with pregnant black women in the Grandma’s Hands Birthing Project Los Angeles organization at the Lillian Mobley Center. Bonaparte, Alicia.

T 02:45–05:30PM. SC Room 230 (Scott Hall) (Pitzer)

Race & Contemporary Performance

(THEA115M PO-01)

What is race and how does the meaning attached to racial categories shape culture and social structures in the United States? We will examine how individuals and groups use their bodies and minds to identify, de-identify, imagine and re-imagine racial dynamics in America via drama and performance. Lu, Joyce J.

TR 09:35–10:50AM. SE Room 100 (Seaver Theatre) (Pomona)

 

Download a copy of this course list [PDF]

Spring Semester 2017

Classes

Course Description

Professor

Time & Location

Research Methods

AFRI010B AF-01

Introduce students to the methodologies used in research on topics pertinent to Africana studies. In keeping with the interdisciplinary nature of the field, introduces students to research methods in the humanities and social sciences including, but is not limited to, interviewing; content analysis; archival, library and Internet research; and participant-observation.

Soliman, Maryan

W 2:45–5:30 PM. SC Campus, Humanities Building, 204

Senior Thesis

AFRI191 AF-04

Senior Thesis. In the Senior Seminar, students will undertake independent research culminating in a substantial thesis. The thesis work will be supervised by one faculty member chosen by the student. Each thesis will be read by one additional reader.

Hurley, Eric A.

To Be Arranged

Senior Thesis

AFRI191 AF-08

Senior Thesis. In the Senior Seminar, students will undertake independent research culminating in a substantial thesis. The thesis work will be supervised by one faculty member chosen by the student. Each thesis will be read by one additional reader.

Thomas, Valorie D.

To Be Arranged

Senior Thesis

AFRI191 AF-12

Senior Thesis. In the Senior Seminar, students will undertake independent research culminating in a substantial thesis. The thesis work will be supervised by one faculty member chosen by the student. Each thesis will be read by one additional reader.

Walker, Sheila

To Be Arranged

Senior Comprehensive Examination

AFRI193 AF-04

In the Senior Seminar, students will prepare for the exam to be taken during their senior year. The comprehensive examination consists of two field examinations that test the depth of the student’s knowledge of Africana Studies. The student chooses two areas in Africana studies (e.g., history and literature) in which to be examined.

Walker, Sheila

To Be Arranged

Art History

The Arts of Africa

ARHI140 PO-01

Survey exploring aesthetic, formal, cultural and national diversity of African arts and architecture. Emphasis on the social, political and religious dynamics fostering art production, iconographic themes, and aesthetic philosophies at specific historic moments in West, Central and North Africa. Critical study of Western art historical approaches and methods used to study diverse traditional African arts and post-independence cinema. Letter grade only.

Jackson, Phyllis J.

T 1:15–4:00 PM. PO Campus, LeBus Court , 201

Critical Race Theory/ Representation

ARHI186L PO-01

Examines the role of The Rule of Law in constructing and maintaining racialized, gendered and classed disparities of justice, as they shape and inform the intellectual, aesthetic, scientific and political convergences of critical jurisprudence with representational practices in African Diasporic visual arts. Letter grade only.

Jackson, Phyllis J.

R 1:15–4:00 PM. PO Campus, LeBus Court , 201

English

Comnty Poetry:Black Feminst rEVO

ENGL009 AF-01

Through Black feminist theories of social justice and aesthetic models of revolutionary poetry in this course students practice the art of being an intelligent witness-participant of community engagement via poetic expression.

Harris, Laura

T 5:00–8:15 PM. PZ Campus, Avery Hall, 202

James Baldwin

ENGL157 SC-01

This course examines the work of James Baldwin, his influences, and legacy both in the United States and internationally. It examines Baldwin's enduring relevance and legacy as one of America's most foremost 20th century writers whose political ideas continue to be widely cited in an age of unresolved racial tensions in the US. His works have influenced Nobel laureates (Japan), as well as contemporary writers, playwrights, essayists and filmmakers internationally who continue to see in his corpus a guide, artistically, stylistically and ideologically. The course thus explores the aesthetics and politics of the James Baldwin in historical and contemporary contexts.

Chancy, Myriam J.A.

M 2:45–5:30 PM. SC Campus, Humanities Building, 120

Spec Topics American Literature

ENGL170J PO-01

Special Topics in American Literature: Toni Morrison. This senior seminar explores the complexities of Morrison's fiction and criticism in the contexts of Black feminist theory, African Diaspora literacies, and American literary and social history. Prerequisite: 67.

Thomas, Valorie D.

TR 1:15–2:30 PM. PO Campus, Crookshank Hall , 210

History

Africa in World Politics from 84

HIST041 AF-01

Attention given to developing a broad understanding of the political, economic, and social changes in Africa after the arrival of Europeans on the continent. The course analyzes the long-lasting socio-political impacts of the Berlin Conference in present-day Africa in terms of governance and ethnic conflicts. We will also bring into sharper focus the Cold War, the rise of strongmen, development issues, new forms of civil society, and democratization processes in Africa. Letter grade only.

Traore, Makhroufi Ousmane

TR 1:15–2:30 PM. PO Campus, Lincoln, 1109

African Diaspora US since 1877

HIST050B AF-01

Recognizing the diverse voices and experiences of people of African descent in the United States, this course introduces students to key issues engaging African Americans from Reconstruction to the late twentieth century. Points of discussion include national identity; distinct political, economic and social approaches; continuing class and gender differences; urbanization; the State; and international influences.

Roberts, Rita

Roberts, Rita–12:15 PM. SC Campus, Humanities Building, 202

Women and Slavery

HIST146 AF-01

Research on slavery has remained centered on males, even after the emergence, in the 1970s, of women's history as a coherent field of study. This seminar intends to correct this imbalance by showing that women played crucial roles in the politics and economies of the households into which men brought them. The course illustrates the many strategies of acquiring and the complex implications of holding women as slaves in Africa, in the Indian Ocean region, and in the Arab and modern Atlantic worlds. Additionally, it focuses on women and household slavery in the more commercialized centers of these regions: southern Africa, the Swahili cities and plantations of eastern Africa, and Muslim western and North Africa. Finally, it analyzes female experiences and their strategies for surviving enslavement, slavers' sexualization of the women they held as slaves, the subsequent gendering of women once emancipated, and the memories of racialized women and their children. (Africa/African Diaspora, South Asia, and the Middle East)

Traore, Makhroufi Ousmane

W 1:15–4:00 PM. PO Campus, Mason Hall, 5

Music

Survey of American Music

MUS 062 PO-01

Survey of American Music. Introduction to the contributions that specific ethnic cultures have made to the diverse fabric of American music. Examines two ethnic populations and the elements that make up the musical life of each group. Lectures, guest presentations and concerts.

Staff

TR 2:45–4:00 PM. PO Campus, Thatcher Music Bldg, 212

Literature

Caribbean Literature

LIT 160 AF-01

Reading and anaylsis of works of fiction, poetry, and drama representing the most important trends in Caribbean literature.

 Shelton, Marie-Denise

TR 1:15–2:30 PM. CM Campus, The Kravis Center, 166

North African Literature/ Culture

LIT 163 AF-01

This course is an introduction to North African Studies which offers an overview of North African literature and culture, through a selection of the works of some of the most important North African authors from diverse ethnic backgrounds (Arab, Berber, French and Jewish). In addition, we will consider a selection of films, photographs, and other visual culture which will provide further insights into the complex social political and religious fabric of each country and the region as a whole. And, of course, we will consider music, which, along with poetry, is a cultural practice and form which is oral and an essential aspect of the everyday life in North Africa. Instructor: Aitel, Fazia. [Elective]

Aitel, Fazia

MW 11:00AM–12:15 PM. CM Campus, Roberts North, 15

Africans/ African Americans in Literature / Special Topics in Literature

LIT 179R HM-01

Othello's Issue: Africans and African Americans in Literature // William Shakespeare's Othello is having something of a "moment." It has been called the play that perfectly captures the issues and anxieties affecting our twenty-first century lives. His play about a black man who rises to the rank of general in the Venetian Army speaks to the possibilities of diversity and a meritocratic system in a multicultural society. However, Othello's murder of his innocent Venetian wife points to the deadly danger of incorporating foreign others in the body politic. At the center of all interpretations of Othello is the question of race: how are we to understand and analyze Othello's blackness, constructed, as it is, for a white audience and represented by a white author? Moreover, how does Othello's blackness become transcendent, able to stand for the seemingly universal, negative associations that get attached to it in the western imaginary? In this course, we will question the premise that positions Shakespeare's play as offering a reflection of our own culture. In addition, we will consider the questions about who gets to write about and understand blackness, black people, and black experiences as we examine the literary and cultural intents and effects of Othello across the centuries. Beginning with Shakespeare, we will consider the way the play, its titular character, and anxieties about race and interracial desire haunt constructions of Africans, blackness, and African Americans in literature by a range of authors, British, American, Black, and White. Some of the texts we will read include Oroonoko, Clotel, Native Son, Invisible Man, Season of Migration North, Harlem Duet, and Beloved.

Dadabhoy, Ambereen

TR 2:45–4:00 PM. HM Campus, Shanahan Center, 2460

Politics

Black Americans & Political System

POLI126 SC-01

This course focuses on the relationship between black Americans and the US government, as well as the continuing struggle for black empowerment since Reconstruction. Careful consideration and analysis will be given to the current social and economical conditions of the black community.

Tyson, Vanessa

M 2:45 – 5:30 PM. SC Campus, Balch Hall , 220

Psychology

Seminar in African American Psychology

PSYC188 AF-O1

Critically examines contemporary literature in African American psychology. Emphasizes the ideas of leading theorists (e.g., Na'im Akbar, Wade Nobles, Linda Myers) and the research literature on contemporary problems (e.g., teen pregnancy, gangs). Reading, writing and speaking intensive.

Paulse, Shelva

MW 11:00AM–12:15 PM. PZ Campus, West Hall, P106

Religion

African-American Religions

RLST082 CM-01

This course offers an introduction to African American religions. The course moves chronologically, examining African religions in the Americas, cultural continuities between African and African American religions, slave religion, and the development of independent African American churches. We will examine the rise of African-American new religious movements such as Father Divine and the Nation of Islam, and the religious dimensions of the Civil Rights Movement. Moving through African-American religious history, we will consider topics such as slave resistance, gender and race, and emigration to Africa.

Bailey, Julius

MW 1:15–2:30 PM. CM Campus, The Kravis Center, 161

Eye of God: Race and Empire

RLST150 AF-01

In mythic cycles from the “Western Tradition,” there has been a sustained intrigue over the relationship between the human eye and the heavenly sun. From the Cyclops of Homer's Odyssey to its refiguring in D.W. Griffith's “The Birth of a Nation,” the powers of the eye are equated with those of its celestial counterpart. This intrigue has been reshaped but not lost with the advent of modern visual surveillance techniques. In this course, we will examine a range of manifestations of the solar eye, paying particular attention to the relationship(s) it bears to reality and the ways in which the solar eye operates in schemes both great and small of confidence and illusion. We will consider works by Plato, Foucault, Ellison and Morrison; documents in government policy; and movies like “The Fly,” “Cube,” “9” and “The Lord of the Rings” trilogy. (PRT). Letter grade only.

Smith, Darryl A.

W 7:00–9:50 PM. PO Campus, Pearsons Hall, 202